• “Is NATO Relevant?” Sarwar Kashmeri with UK MP Mike Gapes, on Skynews

  • What’s Next For NATO: A “Reboot or Delete?” Robin Young, host of Here & Now asks Sarwar Kashmeri

  • Sarwar Kashmeri & NATO 2.0 on Fox News

  • To preserve NATO bridge it to the EU

    NATO used to be the world’s most formidable military alliance. But, its original reason for existence, the Soviet Union, disintegrated years ago, and its dreams of being a world cop are withering in the mountains of Afghanistan.

    Meanwhile, the European Union’s Common Security & Defense Policy (CSDP) has deployed twenty-seven successful military/civil missions from Africa to Asia in the last ten years. Through CSDP, Europeans are increasingly taking charge of managing their own foreign and security policy. NATO is no longer the sole and preeminent Euro-Atlantic security actor.

    But watching NATO fade into irrelevance would be a mistake. It is a tried and true platform to harness the resources of North America and Europe. NATO’s future usefulness depends on its willingness to accept its reduced role, to let the EU handle the day-to-day security needs of Europe, and to craft a relationship with CSDP that will allow North America and Europe to act militarily together, should that ever become necessary.

    It is time for NATO 2.0, a new version of NATO, to fit the realities of an ever more integrated Europe in the twenty-first century.

NATO plans to stay in Afghanistan even after Afghans can handle their own security!

 

There’s an article in the August 22, 2010 edition of NewEurope that reminds me of the delusional world that some in NATO inhabit.

Right after a statement by President Karzai of Afghanistan in front of the representatives of 70 countries gathered in Kabul on July 20, 2010 that,

 …the new government can manage the country on its own, relying on its own armed forces and on a solid financial support of the international community…all responsibility for security and implementation of the national priorities and programs in the country would pass to the Afghan side as early as in 2014.

Pretty good news I’d say. A success for all concerned. But not for NATO’s Secretary General Rasmussen

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen talks to reporters in Kabul, Afghanistan |NEW EUROPE/KULPASH KONYROVA

who addressed reporters after the Karzai speech, at the press center, and told them,

A statement that the national forces of this country can assume the responsibility for their country’s security by 2014 does not mean that NATO troops will leave Afghanistan. They will continue to provide support. We will not leave the people of this country even after the transfer of responsibility to the national security forces; we will stay to help them.

Now that’s a pretty bold statement to make. Afghanistan’s elected leader says thanks for your help, we’ll take it from here after 2014, and the military alliance that has come to Afghanistan to help him says that they really don’t care what the President of Afghanistan says. Foreign troops will stay in your country until they decide to leave.

Did someone say “occupation?” “Colonialism?” Isn’t Afghanistan a soverign state?

It will be interesting to see how Mr. Rasmussen hangs on to NATO troops when the Dutch, Brits, Poles, Canadians, and many of the U.S. military have left.  Seriously, one would have thought the Secretary General would commend Mr. Karzai and say, “Bravo, more power to you.” But I guess that’s too logical.

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